For a DJ, knowledge, skill and technique can all come later

tonkatsu-dj

Tonkatsu DJ Agetarou, episodes 1-2

  1. I’ve been hanging out for this one since I first heard about it. The odd premise — a kid working in his family’s restaurant discovers that making tonkatsu is exactly the same as being a DJ — is just ridiculous enough to be intriguing, while still leaving a bit of room to flesh it out beyond that one joke. And now that it’s here… it’s good!
  2. The flashes of supposed similarity between DJing and frying breaded pork cutlets are… stretched. We’ve got the premise, so the humour comes from seeing how the silly comparison is going to be made this time. Spinning records is like wiping a counter? OK! Rifling through a record shop is like fetching a pickle from the barrel? Why not! It’s not laugh-out-loud funny, but it’s pleasantly amusing. (I also like the way these comparisons develop Aragotou’s character, simultaneously an ambitious dreamer and a daydreaming slacker. Can he succeed?)
  3. “This must be the ripest one!” decides Agetarou, pulling out a record from the pickle barrel to discover… butts. This little moment of embarrassment reminds us that Aragatou is a teenaged boy who is desperately trying to be cool in front of his new friends. A little bit of risqué humour never hurt anybody, and the art style means this isn’t squicky fanservice.
  4.  The art reminds me a little bit of Magnus Carlsson’s Robin, though slightly more detailed. This is a good thing. The carefree lines create the right tone for this show: fun, friendly, not too serious.
  5. There is a record shop a few hundred metres from my house. It’s smaller than the one in this show, less organised. But Mizokuro’s reaction to the woman who wanders in — literally pushing her out the door — seems about right. What is it about niche hobby shops that makes them so hostile to women?